Oak Wilt Woes-Tree Disease

Oak Wilt Woes-Tree Disease

Oak wilt is a tree disease affecting oak trees caused by the fungus Ceratocystic fagacearum. The disease has been found in 21 states causing the most damage in the midwest. It was first found in Wisconsin in 1944 where localized pockets of mortality were found;   nearly half the oaks an area of less than 100 acres were killed. No species of oak is immune or especially resistant to this disease, infections have been found on 16 native species including those of economic and environmental value. Red oak species do seem more susceptible to oak wilt infection and succumb more often than white oaks.

Oak wilt is a tree disease affecting oak trees caused by the fungus Ceratocystic fagacearum.

Leaves on affected oaks will turn dull green or bronze and may appear water-soaked before turning brown or yellow. Damage occurs first along the outer edges and moves toward the leaf’s mid-rib.

Symptoms of oak wilt may first appear on leaves which will turn dull green or bronze and appear water-soaked and wilted prior to turning yellow and brown.  Damage begins along the outer edges and moves toward the leaf’s mid-rib. Wilting leaves curl toward the mid-rib and the delineation between live, green tissue and chlorotic, dying tissue is very distinct. These symptoms appear and spread quickly throughout the crown, this can occur within just a few weeks and results in premature leaf drop at the ends of branches. Heavy defoliation continues, with leaves in all stages of distress falling. Some branches may have persistent green leaves until Autumn, crowns of affected oak trees are rarely uniform.

Symptoms appear and spread quickly throughout the crown, this can occur within just a few weeks and results in premature leaf drop at the ends of branches. Heavy defoliation continues, with leaves dropping in all stages of distress.

Symptoms appear and spread quickly throughout the crown, this can occur within just a few weeks and results in premature leaf drop at the ends of branches. Heavy defoliation continues, with leaves dropping in all stages of distress.

Oak wilt disease progresses rapidly with mortality occurring, in some cases, within 1 or 2 months following disease onset. The majority of trees will die over the course of the year. Oaks will aggressively stump sprout while defoliating or during the next growing season. Fungal mats are sometimes associated with oak wilt disease. These mats are primarily composed of mycelium and form just below the bark, raising and cracking it, attracting insects to the compromised tree. Oak wilt is spread via insect vectors and natural root grafting occurring between healthy and infected trees.

Unfortunately control of oak wilt once it is already present and causing damage is difficult. Prevention is the best control, this includes cultural practices to keep trees and landscape plants healthy such as proper planting and watering, maintaining adequate pH and nutrient applications. If you suspect or have concerns about oak trees on your landscape contact your arborist and visit: http://www.savatree.com/tree-disease-treatment.html.